Articles

Why User Experience Is Not Customer Experience

This article explores the issues surrounding why UXers don't get CX jobs. At issue is the lack of a business discipline within the practice of UX.

"Forrester recently released a report on the rise of the Chief Customer Officer. The emergence of a C-level role with authority over customers’ interactions has caused much hand-wringing within the UX community. It’s like the job (we think) we’re made for has been stolen from us."

How Lean UX Could Improve Application Development, CIO.com March 2012

This article introduces CIOs and IT Pros to the emerging idea of Lean UX and how it can help improve the application development process.

"'Lean UX' is a hot topic in user-experience (UX) circles. It promises to be yet another way to shorten the application development process while delivering greater value to customers and the business."

Making Sense of Minimum Viable Products, Johnny Holland Magazine February 2012

An essay exploring how MVPs are designed to create meaning where none currently exists.

"Minimum viable products are all the rage. The idea is to test the waters and make some sense out of the market before heavily investing in product development. That’s definitely oversimplified, but what I’m going to explore in this post is the 'sense making' aspect of MVPs."

Digital Product Strategy, Gamification, and the Evolution of UX, Johnny Holland Magazine 2011

Why the increasing desire to have better user experiences and incorporate gaming concepts into software products makes the skills of the UX designer strategic rather than tactical.

"A wireframe is a tactical output that (hopefully) partially fulfills a strategic direction for a system. But working with a product manager to figure out how to incorporate gaming concepts into a product moves us, the UX designers, in a strategic direction. This changes the opportunities in front of us as designers. The term I use to encapsulate these opportunities is “digital product strategy.”

"Checklist Thinking" for UX Professionals: Keeping your sanity in a complex project, Johnny Holland Magazine 2011

A well-received article for the user experience design community about how to ensure that innovation and creativity are held accountable to the complete requirements and demands of a complex project.

"It’s common knowledge (or it should be) that discovering requirements during page design is a recipe for madness. But no matter how much we believe this and strive to avoid this, it still happens. We’ve come to terms with the fact that it’s quite natural for clients to recall an infrequently-used feature or edge case when they see a page design. In this case, it’s easy to blame the customer for not having their requirements defined and communicated. Surely, we’re the victims here."

Matching Requirements with User Experience, Johnny Holland Magazine 2011

Another well-received article on the dysfunctional relationships that drive bad software innovation and design.

"As the ‘user experience’ has become essential to the success of many systems, the relationship between the stakeholder and the business analyst has not been kept up to date. Many projects still start with the same approach – quickly make a list of requirements and establish a budget under the assumption that the requirements are comprehensive and complete. This creates problems for designers. How do we break into this relationship and get an early seat at the table?"

Books

Managing Knowledge: A Practical Web-based Approach (Addison Wesley 1998); co-authored with Wayne Applehans and Alden Globe.

One of the first books to describe the convergence of content management and "portal" technologies. I (along with my co-authors) outlined an approach to using web technologies to improve the circulation of knowledge in complex organizations. It was named one of the most influential works of technical communication in the 1990's.

Enterprise Content Services: Connecting Information and Profitability (Addison Wesley 2002); co-authored with Alden Globe.

This book describes the processes and procedures for intranet content governance in the early days of content management systems.

Minimum viable products are all the rage. The idea is to test the waters and make some sense out of the market before heavily investing in product development. That’s definitely oversimplified, but what I’m going to explore in this post is the “sense making” aspect of MVPs.